Constructing the digits of pi from conservation of energy and momentum in collisions

A short one, just to get the ol’ bloggin’ fingers movin’ again’. It’s starting to get chilly outdoors and they’re simply covered in cobwebs!! Where did they come from? How did I get spider webs on my hands…..?

Last year, 3Blue1Brown produced a series of lovely videos (but really, they all are) on a strange little thing. An object is sent bouncing back and forth between a rigid wall and another moving object with a particular (integer!) mass ratio. If this ratio is a power of 100, the number of collisions will be some of the first digits of pi!! Isn’t that nuts.

My two blocks.

Anyone who has taken a high school senior level physics class or above would recognize the need to implement two conservation laws: that of momentum (linear with velocities) and that of energy (quadratic with speeds). Someone with just a bit of programming experience should be able to set up a series of solutions for the speeds after successive collisions, until the “no-collide” condition is met: the two blocks are traveling in the same direction, away from the wall, and gaining distance between them.

Hey, I’ve got a bit of programming experience! I whipped this up to see if I could get the same results.

Both blocks equal. The block on the right is 100^o = 1 times more massive than the block on the left. Three collisions.
100:1. There are 31 collisions in there. Looking good!

10000:1. There are 314 collisions! It looks like it’s working. Trust me. You must trust me.

It looks like they’re doing it right! A fun little exercise. In the spirit of the original prompt I’ll let you find or figure out why it works for yourself. You can always watch Sanderson’s explanation video.

One hint I can give is it is a bit related to the Buffon’s needle technique of finding pi. This is a fun idea that understanding could open some avenues of thought for more difficult estimation problems. Check out the description and explanation on Numberphile:


OK ENJOY PI PLEASE AND THANKS PEACE OUT DUDERINOS

Exploring cellular automata 1

Conway’s game of life is maybe the most well known ruleset for cellular automata. Each cell in a grid has some possible set of states, and set of rules for changing state based on its own and it’s (usually) immediate neighbor cells. Time elapses with a number of discrete steps, sometimes called epochs. In Game of Life, a cell can either be “alive” or “dead” (on or off), and will live for the next time step only if it has one or two alive neighbors.

Some incredible patterns emerge, including spaceships, guns (creating gliders and spaceships), breeders (creating guns), other puffersrakes, long-lived methuselahs (this example creating some gliders).

Other rulesets lead to neat patterns. Here’s a fun one with many cell states. It lets you rate the results as it scans some starting parameter space.

So, we’re certainly not limited to one ruleset. Coming up with one is easy — finding if there are any neat patterns maybe not so much. It might be better to first explore simpler rules — ones in only 1 dimension. In this case, a linear space is segmented into cells, and each cell has only two neighbors. Given some configuration of three cells in a row, the middle cell’s state in the next epoch will be dependent on its own state as well as the two alongside. When considering how to change any cell, since there are only three cells to consider, and only two possible states for each, there are only 2^3 = 8 arrangements to consider when changing any cell. Because of this small number, it’s no problem to display the rule of the automaton as a list of diagrams, each showing one of the eight starting arrangements and the resulting state of the middle cell in the next epoch.

The rule icons for Wolfram’s “Rule 73”, one example of the 8 diagrams needed to completely describe this cellular automaton. To determine if a cell is on or off in the next epoch, compare it and its neighbors to the icons, and find the one whose top row matches. The cell beneath in the icon indicates the state of the cell in the next epoch.

With some initial state, for example:

initial73.png

The next line is produced by scanning over this line and matching the top row with the one from the rule icons.

Rule73.gif

Note that this wraps around, connecting the two edges. This process then continues indefinitely for successive lines. We’re free to pick any length of line and any arrangement of on and off cells as an initial condition, but once this is done, the rest is automated. This particular initial condition for this rule ends up looking like this:

rule73.png

This is kind of neat, but these processes don’t get to show off unless they’ve got some room to work with. Here’s the same rule applied to an initial state of a single black cell in a long row of white.

The repeating triangles are a pattern characteristic of some of the more interesting rules. Rules 30, 90, 110, and 184 are supposedly the most cited in scientific or mathematics articles.

Because there are only 8 arrangements of cells we need to specify to determine a 1-D ruleset, and each arrangement offers the choice of the middle cell turning on or off, there are 2^8 = 256 possible rules of this type. You can see links to them all here. One could argue there are only 128 rules, 64, or even 32, since negating all the colors, taking a mirror image, or negating the mirror image doesn’t change the behavior much. This means each rule is one of a set of four that operate in the same way.

I’ve already linked to the Wolfram Atlas a few times. The images above were taken from there or made using Mathematica. Stephen Wolfram, of Mathematica fame, is also well-known for his work on cellular automata. He’s argued that these things may be more fundamental to nature than mathematics. It’s considered controversial. I haven’t read A New Kind of Science, a book where he lays this all out, but it’s free and online. Maybe worth checking out. It seems like some of the argument hinges on the fact that some of these automata are Turing complete — they can be set up to operate and produce results like any computer program.

I’d just like to note that my interest in cellular automata is based pretty much entirely on having fun. It’s 11 o’ clock on a Saturday night.

A step after checking out the 1-D rules is to explore the 2-D rules. Next I’ll show off a rule and try to do something interesting with it.